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Riot Games Offers $100,000 Bounty to Find Vanguard Security Exploits

Also discusses the architecture behind Vanguard

Poorna Shankar Posted:
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Riot Games is now offering a $100,000 bounty if you find exploits in their anti cheat service, Vanguard, as their Valorant beta is underway.

If you recall, Vanguard runs on system startup, and obviously, some folks didn’t really appreciate that. To that end, Riot has responded with a lengthy blog post detailing Vanguard’s background, philosophy, and the bounty program.

Regarding their view on privacy,

“The bottom line is we would never let Riot ship anything if we weren’t confident it treated player privacy and security with the extreme seriousness they deserve.”

The post then delves into the architecture of the software as well as its architecture. Here again, Riot goes to lengths to explain the privacy portion,

“Vanguard does not collect or process any personal information beyond what the current League of Legends anti-cheat solution does. Riot does not want to know more about you or your machine than what is necessary to maintain high integrity in your game. The game data we collect is used for the operation of the game and integrity-related services such as Packman and Vanguard.”

Towards the end of the post, Riot discusses the bounty program. In short, if you’ve found an exploit or flaw within Vanguard which would bring harm to players, the team wants you to submit that flaw immediately. Doing so may make you eligible for their bounty payout, which, according to their HackerOne page, is up to $100,000.


ShankTheTank

Poorna Shankar

A highly opinionated avid PC gamer, Poorna blindly panics with his friends in various multiplayer games, much to the detriment of his team. Constantly questioning industry practices and a passion for technological progress drive his love for the video game industry. He pulls no punches and tells it like he sees it. He runs a podcast, Gaming The Industry, with fellow writer, Joseph Bradford, discussing industry practices and their effects on consumers.