Dark or Light
logo
Logo

Outriders Demo Boasts Over 9.5 Million Hours Played

Poorna Shankar Posted:
Category:
News 0

People Can Fly, the developers behind Outriders, has released several stats about the demo of their game which went live last month on February 25.

Outriders was originally meant to release earlier this year, but was delayed to April 1. A demo was released on February 25 which contained the first act of the game. Additionally, all your progress from the demo will carry over to the final game upon release.

Since then, the game has proven to be pretty popular as was shown by some stats from the beta. People Can Fly took to Twitter recently to share some of these numbers. It looks like there were over 2 million players in one week for the non-live service looter-shooter.

Additionally, the demo was played for over 9.5 million hours. This resulted in an average play time of 4 hours and 20 minutes. The stats also provide a breakdown of the classes played, and, surprisingly, it’s pretty evenly split amongst the four playable classes. Trickster saw 28.5%, Pryomancer at 27.6%, Technomancer at 23%, and Devastator at 20.9%.

Total damage done was 35.6 trillion with 638 million kills. Of that, 31.8 million captains were killed. There was 3.6 billion scrap collected, and 5.4 million titanium pieces collected. The most popular weapon types were assault rifle, pump shotgun, automatic shotgun, and double gun.

One player managed to rack up 254 hours. That’s impressive. There are over 1000 players who have created more than 10 characters. The most used ability was the thermal bomb which was used on average 34 times by each Pyromancer.

A recent patch to the ongoing demo added a motion blur toggle, provided matchmaking improvements, bug fixes, crash resolutions, and more. The patch is out for PC and the PlayStation consoles with Xbox going through testing.


ShankTheTank

Poorna Shankar

A highly opinionated avid PC gamer, Poorna blindly panics with his friends in various multiplayer games, much to the detriment of his team. Constantly questioning industry practices and a passion for technological progress drive his love for the video game industry. He pulls no punches and tells it like he sees it. He runs a podcast, Gaming The Industry, with fellow writer, Joseph Bradford, discussing industry practices and their effects on consumers.