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CCP Unveils EVE Online's Resource Distribution Update and People Are Not Happy

Nullsec and Wormhole miners affected

Poorna Shankar Posted:
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CCP has outlined the latest update targeting resource distribution in EVE Online, and, well, people aren’t happy.

The first phase of this update is set to go live in October and will create several Primary Supply Zones. So for Hisec, the main supplier of mineral is Tritanium, Lowsec has Isogen and Noxcium, Nullsec has Zydrine, Megacyte, and Morphite. Wormholes have nothing. The biggest changes, according to CCP, is ore DNA. In Short, mineral output for all asteroid ores will change to “create room for a better geographical distribution of minerals.”

Players aren’t happy about this at all. In fact, Angry Mustache of Goonswarm wrote the following on Reddit,

“This resource redistribution solves zero of the current issues with mineral distribution and creates quite a few new ones. Everyone has been hoarding minerals since the start of scarcity, added to literal decades of "spare" low use minerals built up (Isogen for example, is a byproduct of spod, which we mined quite a lot of), meaning prices for "less used minerals" will take quite a long time to adjust to the new abundance because they are still low use. In the meanwhile they will still be worthless.”

Angry Mustache continues in a highly detailed comment noting how problematic this redistribution is. In effect, Mustache claims this change will really hit Nullsec and Wormhole miners pretty hard. This can lead to gameplay in Nullsec feeling unrewarding.

What are your thoughts on this update?


ShankTheTank

Poorna Shankar

A highly opinionated avid PC gamer, Poorna blindly panics with his friends in various multiplayer games, much to the detriment of his team. Constantly questioning industry practices and a passion for technological progress drive his love for the video game industry. He pulls no punches and tells it like he sees it. He runs a podcast, Gaming The Industry, with fellow writer, Joseph Bradford, discussing industry practices and their effects on consumers.