Dark or Light
logo
Logo

Atlas Map Export Feature Available for Server Grid Editor

Poorna Shankar Posted:
Category:
News 0

If you’re a private server owner in pirate survival game, Atlas, you’ll finally be able to export your maps in the server grid exporter. The news and instructions to alter map export file size were shared by the team earlier via Twitter.

In addition to this feature going live on the server grid editor, the team noted that it’s also now possible to change the file size of these map exports. Here’s how you can do that:

  • The settings for the dimension of your exported map images can be seen in the screenshot below
  • To change the size of the cell images, set the number in “Cell Image Size” to the desired dimension before Export
  • To change the size of the world map image, set the number in “Atlas Image Size” to the desired dimension before Export
  • The defaults are: Cell Image Size: 2048; Atlas Image Size: 4096

These instructions follow the recently released Tradewinds Update. The update actually saw an initial delay before finally going live last week. Among the titular tradewinds, the update brought about a new map to Atlas.

Here’s what was changed along with this new map:

  • Island Positions have been moved to account for Tradewinds.
  • Harvesting Resources have been overhauled
    • Most Resource nodes now have a chance to give some type of common base resource
    • Examples include Straw from plants, resin from trees, stone from crystal and gem nodes
  • Freeport islands no longer provide metal
  • Grid Specific Settings have been redistributed
    • Freeports are only in the south.
    • Lawless areas now surround Freeports and give common resources
    • Golden Age and Kraken have moved north 2 grids
    • Claim Islands only exist around the edges of the map.
    • "Lawless" Area Claim take up the remaining maps.

ShankTheTank

Poorna Shankar

A highly opinionated avid PC gamer, Poorna blindly panics with his friends in various multiplayer games, much to the detriment of his team. Constantly questioning industry practices and a passion for technological progress drive his love for the video game industry. He pulls no punches and tells it like he sees it. He runs a podcast, Gaming The Industry, with fellow writer, Joseph Bradford, discussing industry practices and their effects on consumers.