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Corsair Void Elite Wireless RGB Gaming Headset Review

By Ed Orr on October 10, 2019 | Hardware Reviews | Comments

Corsair Void Elite Wireless RGB Gaming Headset Review

Corsair’s Void Wireless RGB is something of a misleading name. Rather than a hollow shell, this peripheral promises a cord-free blitz of color and an immersive sound experience. Follow us as we stare into the void and it blinks back in all its RGB glory.


Initially launched back in Fall 2017, the Corsair Void range made an obvious impression when it landed on shelves. The angular ear cups and reassuringly solid construction meant that whether tethered to the desk or set free, the Void range stands apart from the rest of the market. That initial impression still stands firm with this particular iteration of the series. With so many headsets on the market it can be difficult to make a mark but the Void Elite RGB Wireless is more than just white noise. The specifications are a step up form the Pro version, with increased responsiveness and a significantly improved microphone. All of this, reflecCorsair’s Void Wireless RGB is something of a misleading name. Rather than a hollow shell, this peripheral promises a cord-free blitz of color and an immersive sound experience. Follow us as we stare into the void and it blinks back in all its RGB glory.

Initially launched back in Fall 2017, the Corsair Void range made an obvious impression when it landed on shelves. The angular ear cups and reassuringly solid construction meant that whether tethered to the desk or set free, the Void range stands apart from the rest of the market. That initial impression still stands firm with this particular iteration of the series. With so many headsets on the market it can be difficult to make a mark but the Void Elite RGB Wireless is more than just white noise. The specifications are a step up form the Pro version, with increased responsiveness and a significantly improved microphone. All of this, reflected in the stats:

Headphone Specifications

  • Headphone Frequency Response 20Hz - 30 kHz
  • Headphone Battery Life Up to 16 hours
  • Headphone Sensitivity 116dB (+/-3dB)
  • Headphone Wireless Range Up to 40 feet (12m)
  • Impedance 32k Ohms @ 1 kHz
  • Headphone Type Wireless
  • Headphone Connector USB Wireless Receiver
  • Headphone Drivers 50mm neodymium
  • Audio 7.1 Surround
  • Lighting RGB
  • Platform PC, PS4

Microphone Specifications

  • Microphone Impedance 2.0k Ohms
  • Microphone Type Omnidirectional
  • Microphone Frequency Response 100Hz to 10kHz
  • Microphone Sensitivity -42dB (+/-3dB)

Arriving in a typically loud black and yellow package, the Void Elite RGB Wireless don’t have to work particularly hard to establish their gamer credentials. While brands like Lucidsound and event he Corsair Virtuoso line take a more subdued approach design philosophy, these scream for attention. While the Voids might make a lot of noise, that doesn’t come at the cost of quality. Escaping from is cardboard shackles, the Void feels very well put together. The angular plastic backplates are instantly recognizable to anybody that’s already invested in the Corsair gaming line and come with the company logo planted across them. The cylindrical metal constructs that sprout up from the earphones and up into the headband feel bulletproof, while the crown of this headset continues that same solid mix of heavy plastics atop a metal framework. The Void Elite is, as I’ve described, unlike any other headset I’ve handled. The sweeping angles give a sense that this peripheral is built for speed and the detailing even follows this flow. I love it, but I also have neon pin hair so I’m quite sure the aesthetic is going to prove divisive.

The heavy-duty build of the Void Elite is not for show. The RGB head[ohones drop in at almost 400 grams making it something around 30%  heavier than headsets like the Steelseries Arctis series. lThis, thankfully does not come at the expense of comfort. The massive breathable mesh cups that surround the earcups might be an odd shape but they take the brunt of the pressure applied by the core of the corsair. In addition to the foam padding around each ear, a substantial cushion is plastered to the top of the headband and wrapped in the same breathable fabric. When combined with the nine points of extension along either side of the headband, 90 degrees of rotation on both ear cups, and the option to tilt the ears for comfort the Corsair Void Elite RGB is surprisingly accommodating for its weight. With lots of room for manoeuver and plenty of padding, I didn’t find myself fighting anything but the Icbrood after a 6-hour stint in Tyria this weekend.

Tuning

The audio extruded from the Corsair Void Elite RGB Wireless is equally impressive. Corsair’s line up of headphones almost universally include a set of high spec 50mm drivers. The clarity of output that these can produce has only gone up with this iteration, providing an enhanced response range and ensuring that a broad variety of experiences are available to players who want to immerse themselves in virtual worlds. The Corsairs Void range is comparable to any top range of headsets and the custom tuning provides a good all-round experience that eases off the excessive bass that too often undermines other headsets. In practice, this meant that I was able to hear enemies as they crept up on me while speech or ambient audio still managed to feel immersive and wasn’t drowned in distortion.

This clarity is, at least in part, thanks to an impressive wireless connection. The Corsair Void Elite RGB Wireless uses a 2.4Ghz low latency wireless connection that runs from the included USB adaptor. The dongle style connector manages surprisingly well when positioned above your desk. Like any wire-free system, it is subject to any surroundings and, in my experience, the headset can stretch to around 30 feet once people, cats, and modern electronics start interfering with the signal. This doesn’t quite match the 40-foot specification but real life is far from perfect.

The mic, equally, is not perfect but it is a whole lot better than I expected. The Void RGB Elite Wireless has a flip-down mic that rests on a boom arm and feels like an add on to the main body of this headset. The rubberized arm does not entirely match the rest of the Void’s aesthetic but that certainly doesn’t detract from the quality. While this still won’t beat a good stand-alone mic like the Yeti Nano, it does very well to pick up the person in command of any raid, cutting out plenty of, if not all, background noise. It even made me sound human. The sample below should give a good impression of the integrated mic.

Surround and EQ

Much of the Void’s in-game immersion comes thanks to the Corsair 7.1 surround compatibility. Whether you have a preference for Windows Sonic or Dolby 7.1 directional audio, Corsair has you covered. Just like the Pro series of RGB headsets, the Void Elite RGB range combines excellent clarity and the sort of drivers that make directional audio worthwhile using.

For those that are less inclined to wonder where the crack of the gun is coming from and want to crank up the bass then the Corsair Pro range provides a good range of personalization options via the iCUE software. Just like Corsair’s dedicated headphone hub, iCUE allows owners of these audio devices to switch on surround sound, modify the mic pickup, and adjust sidetone. A variety of preset and custom equalizer settings are right where you’d expect them and it all feels consistent with corsair’s design philosophy.

In addition to the audio elements, iCUE provides a whole rainbow of options when it comes to RGB decoration. A blank slate is joined by 17 extra lighting effects, millions of color variations, and even the option to change based on the temperature fluctuations. The range of lighting options is overwhelming and it doesn’t stop there. iCUE also integrates the Void Elite Wireless into Corsair’s wider family of products. This software houses a range of dynamic lighting options, synchronized settings, and system configuration tools that allow the look and feel of Corsair’s compatible components to work as a single suite of armaments.

While I quite platform agnostic when it comes to my decoration, the evolution of Corsair’s software system is a massive draw, even for me. With a wide enough catalog of parts to build a homogeneous piece of hardware, it isn’t hard to see the power that Corsair wields with iCUE threaded throughout every component.

Of course, this RBG component is a huge drain on the overall battery life of the Voids. The quoted lifespan of 16 hours proved particularly difficult to test in the limited time we had to preview these but I have managed to survive a raid on Runefest, a six-hour raid in Tyria, and a day at work without needing to recharge. Coupled with some reasonably active power conservation systems, these headphones should survive even the longest raids.

How much atter life to sacrifice to the RGB gods is far from the only potential compromise the Void Elite RGB owner has to make, however. If this is the first time you’ve considered Corsair then iCUE adds a whole other set of decisions and another potential performance drain. The push to build RGB form on top of suitably functional hardware is something I still don’t entirely get on with, and the Corsair Void Elite RGB Wireless headset is entirely guilty of this.

RGB Means Gaming

The Corsair Void RGB Elite headset is a decidedly PC gaming-focused headset and is an appropriate step up from the Pro RGB line. The increased mic range, improved driver response, and Playstation 4 compatibility make the jump up worth the price for gamers who want the best RGB setup they can get without the wires. The fact that the wireless connection has barely featured on this review is a testament to how good it actually is and my only real commiseration is that the styling of the Corsair Void Elite RGB headset means it will stay firmly beside my gaming rig, while something like the Corsair Virtuoso could be committed to the daily commute too.

Final Thoughts

For the cost of £99.99 or local equivalent, the Corsair Void RGB Elite is an outstanding wireless headset for the money. A massive range of customization, great iCUE integration, and impressive battery life makes this headset range my first pick for cord-free combat. You can find out more about the Corsair RGB Elite Wireless headset over at the official Corsair website now.

Pros

  • iCUE connectivity is impressive
  • Well constructed
  • Very comfy

Cons

  • Looks that are only good for a gaming rig
  • Lack of additional connectivity
  • Still not as light as other options

The product described in this article was provided by the manufacturer for the purpose of review.