Trending Games | World of Warcraft | Overwatch | Lost Ark | Fallout 76

    Facebook Twitter YouTube Twitch.tv YouTube.Gaming Discord
Register
Quick Game Jump
Members:3,822,057 Users Online:0
Games:974 

Show Blog

Link to this blogs RSS feed

Producers Plight

A blog about how being a Producer in the free to play industry, can suck occasionally. Examples inside!

Author: GMAracton

Producers Plight: Or why running a game can suck occasionally.

Posted by GMAracton Friday August 14 2009 at 8:35PM
Login or Register to rate this blog post!

This is the first blog I've ever written. Actually, I just learned how to read and write, so really, it's the first thing I've ever written in my life. Go me. My name is #$@$ Adams and I am an associate producer for a game called DragonSky.

I guess the point in writing this blog is to explain to everyone how awesome our game is, and how awesome it is working in the video game industry. Well the first part is true, the second however is true, only sometimes.

Being a producer for a game is quite a lot of work. Many times I can be seen in the office weeping uncontrollably under my desk. Others, I can be found trying to rob the snack machine. So as you can see, the job can be pretty harrowing, and can cause both binge snack eating and sporadic fits of rage and tears.

This is not to say that being a producer isn't cool. Quite the contrary. The first time I saw DragonSky and learned that she would be mine, I quivered. Literally quivered, because the game was actually pretty cool, and was based around mastering all forms of martial arts. I mean, that's pretty damn cool. Switching styles and weapons on the fly, and watching it play out in live action glory.

That aside, being a producer can also suck. For example when we received the game, it was completely un-localized. Meaning that all of the language used in the game was Korean. Everything, from the quests, to the monster names, to all of the system messages laid before me in romanized Korean words. Words like, "Geonghuyensangupa", and "Sseryondogan Mountain". Seeing twenty separate and completely unorganized excel spreadsheets full of these words, made me want to lay down in a little ball and sleep the rest of my life away. Instead, we got to work. Myself and two other gentlemen began organizing to the best of our abilities. We color coded, made tables, renamed files and created an inbox/outbox for all of the insanity that was localization.

That was 4 months ago. Today, the game is about 60% localized in English. With more on the way, and I don't really cry as much anymore. I did however learn a valuable lesson about working with foreign companies, and the value of being organized.

It made me proud to know that three guys were able to localize tens of thousands lines of text in a relatively short period of time, without murdering one another.

Well, I suppose I should stop the blog here. I realize I didn't really explain anything about the game, and spent the entire time complaining about localization. But maybe this Blog will help people understand that running a game isn't all fun and "games" (get it?). Most often it's a crapton of work.


Next week I'll talk about the joys of "Fixing" bugs, and why when players say "JUST FIX IT", it's not really as simple as they think.


Peace

dragonsky.aeriagames.com/

Download our Game, or I will find you.