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MMORPG.COM Game/On Podcast Radio Show!

Game/On Podcast Radio Show

This Week

Game On - S2E16 - ArenaNet's Programmers Speak to the Challenges of Coding Tyria: Our own Garrett Fuller was at GDC Online this past week, and spoke with several members of ArenaNet's programming team for Guild Wars 2, including Cameron Dunn, Studio Technical Director, Braeden Shosa, Gameplay Programming Team Lead, Chad Taylor, Engine Programming Team Lead, and Stephen Clarke-Willson, Server Programming Team Lead.

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MumboJumbo writes: Some serious challenges running these icebergs! Tue Oct 16 2012 8:56AM Report
Wizardry writes:

I got a bad vibe from the very first questions.

they did not give any real definitive answer because it is THAT EASY to pull off what they are doing.

The WHOLE as they like to use for a term is nothing "amazing" a word also used.

Of course a team gets behind the content,why did they even mention the obvious?

You code a pallette of instruction code into youir engine that allows each individual designer to simply check off what he wants to be actrive or not.

These events are nothing more than regular quests,kept inviisible that is triggered in,and so happens ALL quests in EVERY game involve triggers,so again absolutely NOTHING new here and why they can't give any real answers.

Hearing the praise and patting themselves on the back,makes me lose interest real quick.

I tuned in because i really enjoy the TECHNICAL side of game talk,but they offered nothing ,other than to say their guy gave a speech PRIOR on tools.I couldn't listen anymore,it was obvious where that setup interview was headed,just the usual PR/marketing/self praise ANET loves to do.

Tue Oct 16 2012 4:42PM Report
TheIronLegion writes:

@Wizardry You sound like someone who doesn't actually understand how coding works or the work involved in it and think you have the right to sit back and criticize the work of others without basing your merits. I'm sure we all enjoy the technical side of game talk, but slighting them because you didn't like their answers is just silly. You probably don't even understand how complex the code is for GW2 and how much effort and thought had to go into it. This isn't just some quest triggering mad house, it is a fairly intricate web of people wielding the power of cause and effect. Usually quests affect one person and they see the effects of it on their screen, but no one else can participate(unless they are partied). Here you have an open world where everything happens for everyone. This probably required Arenanet to come up with a different structure of code to handle everything. Yes, everything has triggers. Even the precious, highly sought after sandboxes(that were apparently the concept of the gods) have triggers. They actually have more triggers, on average, than your typical theme park MMO/RPG. Think abuot it. If you touch this rock in a sandbox you want something to happen right? Then there needs to be a trigger. In a theme park it really doesn't matter as much.

So don't sit there on your high chair looking down your nose at them as if you know everything in the world. They have every right to be proud of their work as it is good work! Who are you to say otherwise?

Tue Oct 16 2012 5:39PM Report
amadeuz writes: Apparently sound like @Wizardry doesn't know anything about how coding programing work and just troll. Just put your bias away before post @Wizardry, thank you Tue Oct 16 2012 10:20PM Report
FastSloth writes:

@TheIronLegion

 

"Here you have an open world where everything happens for everyone. This probably required Arenanet to come up with a different structure of code to handle everything."

 

lolwut? It "probably" did what?

 

"They actually have more triggers, on average, than your typical theme park MMO/RPG. Think abuot it. If you touch this rock in a sandbox you want something to happen right? Then there needs to be a trigger. In a theme park it really doesn't matter as much."

 

LOLWUT? If you're sitting in a glass house, don't throw with stones. For you that means, don't accuse others of not having an idea. I'm afraid you just copied the sentence structure of someone who has something to say but forgot the content and replaced it with random words.

Tue Oct 16 2012 11:04PM Report
Nitth writes:

..He didnt actually answer questions like;

"What was the biggest challange when programming dynamic events"

 

Now, he did give a very broad open response. but what he should of said should of been something along the lines of:

 

"When designing and programing dynamic events the hardest challange we faced was managing the memory requirements to an acceptable level to give the gamer a smooth and stable experience"

Thats just an example. But yeah have to aggree with wizzardry.

Wed Oct 17 2012 2:03AM Report
Scot writes:

I think they may have been asked to keep it really simple for the laymen. That makes a technical chat rather difficult, not sure there is much point to a technical talk that avoids jargon.

This sounds like a presentation speech to Dragons Den asking for more funding. :)

Wed Oct 17 2012 6:22AM Report
TheIronLegion writes:

@Knowyourmeme.com called and want their "lolwut" back...

<span com_who"="">But seriously, all my points were rather valid. The word "probably" that you seemed to be particularly affectionate for is a very loose term. Probably means yes or definitely  more than it actually means probably. What's more is you didn't give a response with any substance. I think your post amounted to 2 or 3 sentences of actual meaningful thoughts. The rest are just you saying "lolwut?" and blowing smoke out your arse while throwing sticks at the trojan horse.

I think you just didn't like what I had to say. You PROBABLY saw the validity in some of my points and couldn't come up with a meaningful response.

So it seems that you're standing next to me in that glass house...

Wed Oct 17 2012 2:47PM Report
GameOvr writes:

as a systems dev manager for about 20 years of a 30 year programming career, everything they said made perfect sense.

 

even a programmer usually does not undertand 'big'... that is the leap from single instance applications to applications and back end code that has to be efficient and scalable. it takes a programmer usually 5-7 years to start grokking that level of programming.

Wed Oct 17 2012 4:03PM Report

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