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Age of Wushu Forum » General Discussion » Sandbox Features?

8 posts found
  Lustmord

Hard Core Member

Joined: 12/21/05
Posts: 1102

 
OP  10/18/13 10:43:01 PM#1
What are the sandbox features in Wushu that you enjoy?
  Gdemami

Elite Member

Joined: 9/23/08
Posts: 7313

10/18/13 10:50:46 PM#2


Originally posted by Lustmord

What are the sandbox features in Wushu that you enjoy?

That term makes no sense, nothing like that exist since features, do not determine a design. Sandbox is a design.

So you might ask something more specific about the game. What kind of features are you looking for?

  Lustmord

Hard Core Member

Joined: 12/21/05
Posts: 1102

 
OP  10/19/13 2:02:34 AM#3

It's a pretty simple question....... way to dodge it.

  thecapitaine

Apprentice Member

Joined: 3/06/11
Posts: 400

10/20/13 3:39:06 PM#4

I'll preface this by saying that in Wushu terms I'm very, very much a novice player.  So, there are a lot of systems and activities that I have yet to interact with in detail and I may get some details wrong.  As far as the sandbox features that I'm enjoying most, here's my list.

 

1.  Character Development.  Wushu is a bit deceptive at the first, from what I can tell.  You are more or less funneled into one of the eight schools, which each teach their own kung fu sets.  However, that's just the very tip of a big iceberg.  You aren't limited to just those skills but can acquire the other schools' skills via events, buying from other players, and (I think) rare drops.  Beyond that, there's a number of layers to progression, from internals to meridians to reputation and beyond.  Unlike most games it doesn't feel like a race to the top or towards one FotM spec as much as the start of what promises to be a long, twisting journey.

 

2.  World.  I grew up watching hour upon hour of kung fu movies every Saturday afternoon as a kid.  The world of Wushu feels just like those movies come alive.  The landscape is beautiful and large, fantastical at times but completely ordinary at others.  Players don't want to starve, so they eat foods that player chefs make, that player farmers and hunters provide, that the open PvP world makes you work to get.  Virtually anything you want to do in the game can be challenged by another player who could benefit from your failure.  The names, the titles, the snippets of lore and quests all bring to life the feeling of being in a Wuxia novel.

 

3.  Complexity.  First, this is not necessarily restricted only to sandboxes but most themeparks offer few genuinely complex systems in comparison.  Also, it's a two-edged sword for Wushu.  In some ways the game is almost indecipherable thanks to the foreign concepts (meridians, jianghu, internal/external, breath/brawn, etc) and abysmal translation.  On the other hand, after some time of banging up against it, the skies clear somewhat and it all begins to make sense.  What's great about Wushu's systems is that they really are layered so that once you feel pretty capable at one level, you're immediately met by another set of choices and challenges and new concepts to tackle.

 

4.  Little Things.  It's the little things, to me, that make a game world seem like a real place.  The Elder Scrolls series is good at this, with their books that can be read, NPCs that go about their day, etc.  Criminals aren't just killed, they're caught, jailed, and executed (with time outs and debuffs provided).  Characters don't really log off, they continue to be in the world-- as guards, busboys, beggars, and more once the player quits for the night.  Mail is sent via carrier pigeons items.  There are minigames everywhere to give life to activities like Team Practice, cook offs against master chefs, and playing music.  Weiqi is in and playable.

  Gdemami

Elite Member

Joined: 9/23/08
Posts: 7313

10/21/13 4:46:17 AM#5


Originally posted by Lustmord

It's a pretty simple question....... way to dodge it.


Yes, simple question. Why don't you answer it then?


Originally posted by Gdemami

What kind of features are you looking for?

  Lustmord

Hard Core Member

Joined: 12/21/05
Posts: 1102

 
OP  10/25/13 7:20:12 PM#6
Originally posted by thecapitaine

I'll preface this by saying that in Wushu terms I'm very, very much a novice player.  So, there are a lot of systems and activities that I have yet to interact with in detail and I may get some details wrong.  As far as the sandbox features that I'm enjoying most, here's my list.

 

1.  Character Development.  Wushu is a bit deceptive at the first, from what I can tell.  You are more or less funneled into one of the eight schools, which each teach their own kung fu sets.  However, that's just the very tip of a big iceberg.  You aren't limited to just those skills but can acquire the other schools' skills via events, buying from other players, and (I think) rare drops.  Beyond that, there's a number of layers to progression, from internals to meridians to reputation and beyond.  Unlike most games it doesn't feel like a race to the top or towards one FotM spec as much as the start of what promises to be a long, twisting journey.

 

2.  World.  I grew up watching hour upon hour of kung fu movies every Saturday afternoon as a kid.  The world of Wushu feels just like those movies come alive.  The landscape is beautiful and large, fantastical at times but completely ordinary at others.  Players don't want to starve, so they eat foods that player chefs make, that player farmers and hunters provide, that the open PvP world makes you work to get.  Virtually anything you want to do in the game can be challenged by another player who could benefit from your failure.  The names, the titles, the snippets of lore and quests all bring to life the feeling of being in a Wuxia novel.

 

3.  Complexity.  First, this is not necessarily restricted only to sandboxes but most themeparks offer few genuinely complex systems in comparison.  Also, it's a two-edged sword for Wushu.  In some ways the game is almost indecipherable thanks to the foreign concepts (meridians, jianghu, internal/external, breath/brawn, etc) and abysmal translation.  On the other hand, after some time of banging up against it, the skies clear somewhat and it all begins to make sense.  What's great about Wushu's systems is that they really are layered so that once you feel pretty capable at one level, you're immediately met by another set of choices and challenges and new concepts to tackle.

 

4.  Little Things.  It's the little things, to me, that make a game world seem like a real place.  The Elder Scrolls series is good at this, with their books that can be read, NPCs that go about their day, etc.  Criminals aren't just killed, they're caught, jailed, and executed (with time outs and debuffs provided).  Characters don't really log off, they continue to be in the world-- as guards, busboys, beggars, and more once the player quits for the night.  Mail is sent via carrier pigeons items.  There are minigames everywhere to give life to activities like Team Practice, cook offs against master chefs, and playing music.  Weiqi is in and playable.

Thank you.

This was the type of response I was looking for.

  VengeSunsoar

Advanced Member

Joined: 3/10/04
Posts: 4874

Be Brief, Be Bright... Be Gone.

10/28/13 7:01:14 PM#7

I am very very new.  I tried it about a month ago for about an hour and was turned off by 17 million get free gold ads.  But I was bored so downloaded it again and played for a couple hours more seriously.

and...

I'm pretty confused actually :)

I like how it seems I can concentrate on the skills I want.  I think I can anyway.  Between experience and cultivation and meridian I'm not sure what I'm doing at all.

If thats the case I'll stick around more.

But I can double jump so it's fun.

I'll tell you more as I go.

Quit worrying about other players in a game and just play.

  thecapitaine

Apprentice Member

Joined: 3/06/11
Posts: 400

11/04/13 1:21:14 AM#8
Originally posted by VengeSunsoar

I am very very new.  I tried it about a month ago for about an hour and was turned off by 17 million get free gold ads.  But I was bored so downloaded it again and played for a couple hours more seriously.

and...

I'm pretty confused actually :)

I like how it seems I can concentrate on the skills I want.  I think I can anyway.  Between experience and cultivation and meridian I'm not sure what I'm doing at all.

If thats the case I'll stick around more.

But I can double jump so it's fun.

I'll tell you more as I go.

 

AoW's forums are kind of... lacking.  However, I do suggest checking out Snail's novice and advanced guides and (more importantly) some of the player made guides.  I highly recommend starting at the following link to get a jumpstart into jianghuhttp://www.ageofwushu.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=6477

I'm very new as well and I've found that asking your school/guild mates is one of the best ways to pick up advice and direction.  If you can best the poor translation and early confusion, you'll really start to see how many options you have to build the character you want.