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Guild Wars 2 Forum » General Discussion » [Interview] with Colin - huge content updates in the coming months

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85 posts found
  grimal

Spotlight Poster

Joined: 9/11/05
Posts: 2079

12/04/12 12:13:15 PM#61
Originally posted by Gaia_Hunter
Originally posted by grimal
Originally posted by Gaia_Hunter

Guild Wars started as a PvP game with minimal PvE but since Nightfall, Guild Wars became a game much more focused in PvE.

I've always laughed when I read people saying Guild Wars 2 would be/is a PvP focused game.

Not true.  It was both a PVE and PVP game.   The PVE portion itself was very large before any of the expansions.

It is indeed true.

The PvE side of prophecies was slow, but it was clearly designed as an introduction to the PvP, with the Crystal desert missions teaching PvP mechanics.

The last big addition to PvP was Factions, which introduced a very quick PvE campaign and Allianced Battles, Jade Quarry and Fort Aspenwood as a bridge between PvE and PvP.

The objective up until that time was to encourage players to do PvE as a tutorial (PvP purists criticized Anet for forcing them to play PvE to unlock skills and weapons) and then move into PvP.

Also seen in the insistance of keeping the skills the same for PvE and PvP.

Anet then just changed its view and focused on giving PvE players things to do if they wanted to strictly play PvE like titles, PvE-only skills, Hard Mode, etc.

Eye of the North was strictly a PvE campaign (aside from a handfull of profession skills).

In the End it might have been a PvE and a PvP game but it started as a PvP game with a minor PvE component and evolved into a game where PvE was as important if not more important than PvP.

GW2 splits the PvE from the PvP from the get go.

If one compares Nightfall and Eye of the North with Prophecies and Factions, there is little doubt that the game shifted towards PvE.

If we compare GW2 with Prophecies the difference about the ratio of PvE:PvP content is mind numbing.

I still found the PVE content to be quite bountiful.  I think neglecting that portion of the game and reducing the entire campaing to nothing more than "introduction" to PVP is really not giving it it's fair due.

"I'm sorry, if you were right, I'd agree with you." - Robin Williams

  grimal

Spotlight Poster

Joined: 9/11/05
Posts: 2079

12/04/12 12:15:18 PM#62
Originally posted by EsLafiel
Originally posted by fiontar
Originally posted by snapfusion
Originally posted by Volgore

Sounds good, but i guess alot of players would prefer them to fix their basic game in first place.

The state of many mechanics, systems and classes is still embarrasing, while ANet's communication (or shall i say "attitude") is just unprofessional.

Got my money's worth though, but no amount of content is going to bring me back as long as they don't get their basic game together.

The reason I left GW2 had nothing to do with content, its the incredibly simplistic repetative combat mechanics.  The lack of game immersion with the instancing of every zone,  All the quick travel, it just doesnt feel like a world it just like multiplayer maps all stiched together.

I find the game very immersive. I typically only quick travel when logging on and before logging off, unless I need to meet up with guildmates some where. The zones are massive and I spent about 10 hours, split over two days, completing one of the level 70-80 zones. The zones are beautiful and well designed. I also regularly return to lower level zones I like and once the goal of zone completion is out of the way, I can spend days just doing my own thing there. Sometimes I focus on a region, rather than a zone, doing a patrol circuit, gathering and doing all the DEs I stumble across. The brief zoning is a tiny blip that I don't even register any more.

I've logged over 570 hours since launch. I still have zones I haven't seen. Tons of hidden locations I know exist, refuse to use spoilers to find and haven't seriously starting looking for yet. In an era where most MMOs are lucky to provide 40-80 hours of game play before transitioning to end rgame raid progressions, GW2 is a huge breath of fresh air and by far the best value in the genre.

As to combat, yeah, controlled encounters can feel a bit repetative in that most professions can handle routine encounters with a set routine of a small number of skills and the occassional dodge, (along with a lot of movement. If you aren't moving most of the time in GW2 combat, you probably aren't doing it right). The combat shines when the unpredictable happens, with adds or a tougher mob than you were expecting. Rather than sticking to a set routine, the player is usually forced to open up the full toolkit of skills available to them, really pay attention to the timing of their dodges and move skillfuly.

Even as a level 80 with Exotic Gear who can solo very tough level 80 encounters with some skill, tactics and strategy, I still find myself taking a dirt nap while running around in a lower level zone because I failed to pay attention or underestimated the difficulty of a situation, or just because I didn't notice a roving patrol until it was too late. That's what I love about this game.

If I start to get bored with the combat dynamics of my profession, I'll change up my weapon choices, or my build and learn to master a different way of doing things. A Dagger/Dagger thief plays a good deal different than a Sword/Pistol thief or a Shortbow thief, even with in the same trait build. In other games, I may have 30 skills to juggle, but if I want to significantly change the way combat plays out, I probably need to role a new class, since talent trees usually offer very few play altering options. GW2s professions also play very differently from each other. Profession choice and weapon/build options provide many dozens of mainstream options for people to fit a particular playstyle, with many viable fringe builds on top of the more recognized options.

The world here is massive. World vs. World PvP and Structured PvP are fun and compelling. There is a lot of dungeon content for those who like those things.

IMO, the live content updates so far have been a mixed bag, but I mostly appreciate what they are trying to do, even if they haven't always succeeded. I disagree with some recent additions to the game, but there is so much to do here I can afford to skip things I don't like or just don't care to be a part of. I'm hoping that future content additions will be a little more balanced. (Less "end game" and more World Content). I like the sound of the hype Colin has put forth, but given the many ways the relatively modest November Event failed, or the sparsity of content in the new mini-zone, I have to be a bit skeptical about a pair of updates promising to add "a full expansion's worth of content" to the game. I'll believe it when I see it. :)

+1 for this,

 

Ive got entire zones that ive not gotten to and I got close to 900hrs.

 

900 hours is 37 days of nonstop play.  I would not consider that casual.  I'm just pointing this out because you are obviously a hardcore fan for putting in that amount of time.

There's nothing wrong with that, it's just that extreme views often blind themselves to others.

 

"I'm sorry, if you were right, I'd agree with you." - Robin Williams

  Tonin109

Apprentice Member

Joined: 6/15/12
Posts: 202

Our Opinion May Differ

12/04/12 1:05:56 PM#63

the game is like 3 month old and people keep asking for this or that and this and that and why there is no blabla and why they dont add this

they're adding contents every month , fixing bugs, making patchs frequently etcetc  for the price of the game box

name me a game with monthly fee that gives what gw2 gives

to the OP

thank you for the link , i cant wait for the  W vs W update

  avalon1000

Advanced Member

Joined: 3/04/08
Posts: 725

12/04/12 1:21:25 PM#64
The server transfer problem with RvRvR should be addressed. Also, I would buy cosmetic items if I could skin them over armour and not just have town clothes.
  RizelStar

Apprentice Member

Joined: 8/12/11
Posts: 2823

We all breathe and we all die.

12/04/12 1:30:42 PM#65
Originally posted by Tonin109

the game is like 3 month old and people keep asking for this or that and this and that and why there is no blabla and why they dont add this

they're adding contents every month , fixing bugs, making patchs frequently etcetc  for the price of the game box

name me a game with monthly fee that gives what gw2 gives

to the OP

thank you for the link , i cant wait for the  W vs W update

I believe Rift does but thats about it.

 

Without a monthly fee could possibly be a better question IMO.

I might get banned for this. - Rizel Star.

I'm not afraid to tell trolls what they [need] to hear, even if that means for me to have an forced absence afterwards.

P2P LOGIC = If it's P2P it means longevity, overall better game, and THE BEST SUPPORT EVER!!!!!(Which has been rinsed and repeated about a thousand times)

Common Sense Logic = P2P logic is no better than F2P Logic.

  IPolygon

Advanced Member

Joined: 11/20/11
Posts: 701

12/04/12 1:44:30 PM#66
Originally posted by Gaia_Hunter

The thing with seamless worlds.

Name me MMORPGs with seamless worlds that have a physics engine as good as guild wars 2.

As I said before, why do people think most FPS have map caps no larger than 64 players and most are just 32 or 16?

It is one thing to have a server that deals with skills that require a target and can only hit that target and have a server that have projectile spells that can be fired with no target and hit whatever crosses it path.

 

 

I don't think physics have anything to do with map size. The physics you describe are nothing but raycasts which do something with the first hit target. That's not phyiscs, tho. Maps in FPS are usually that small, because a) it takes a lot of time to design a map for large amounts of players (see why we got 3 copies of the same map in WvW) even longer when considering objective-based play, b) it takes much more time to debug big maps.

I need to get back on topic. Since ANet is really slow with fixing major bugs like the culling issues and other bugs plague current content, I'd be more happy if ANet could use more resources on fixing existing content than pushing out more. I know, I know, you don't need a programmer to fix content, but there are still bugs which plague the respective side for each dev. Since I already posted what I feel this game is lacking the most, I won't paste the same thing again.

The bottom line is: I am happy that ANet continuous to improve the game, however sometimes I feel like they don't know what they aimed for at release (anyone remember the very bad, even horrific real people trailer that invoked a "this game is special" vibe...somehow) and how they want to achieve that, and at the same time need to improve their ways of setting priorities.

For example, I don't need a new pvp tournament I can pay for. What I need first is proper matchmaking and leagues including leaderboards, so players don't get stomped by far better players on a regular basis. Or in PvE terms, they need to stop invalidating (read: make obsolete) old content asap, so not everyone runs the most rewarding dungeon (FotM) all the time. Make all content equally rewarding, but offer unique skins in different areas of the game. Then people will spread over across all Tyria and there won't ever form social hubs, while the rest of the areas feel deserted.

But that's just how I feel about this game.
  fiontar

Hard Core Member

Joined: 4/07/04
Posts: 3705

12/04/12 4:09:39 PM#67
Originally posted by grimal
 

900 hours is 37 days of nonstop play.  I would not consider that casual.  I'm just pointing this out because you are obviously a hardcore fan for putting in that amount of time.

There's nothing wrong with that, it's just that extreme views often blind themselves to others.

 

I don't really get the point. GW2 is a massivr game with much breadth and depth. You really need to play the game for a fair number of hours to really start to grasp how much the game does offer. People who follow the "new normal" of MMO play, where they buy a new title, play it for 10-40 hours before writing it off an moving on would be completely missing out if they applied that routine to GW2.

That people have played several hundred hours and still haven't seen the entire game still aren't bored and are still having a blast has to tell people something positive about the game. For casuals, several hundred hours could fill a year or more of regular play and you certainly can not beat the value of that for a game you buy once and never pay a subscription fee for!

Want to know more about GW2 and why there is so much buzz? Start here: Guild Wars 2 Mass Info for the Uninitiated

  Kuppa

Novice Member

Joined: 9/24/10
Posts: 3443

The problem with censorship is ********

12/04/12 4:12:47 PM#68
There goes the claims that you need a sub for an mmo out the window!


  Torvaldr

Elite Member

Joined: 6/10/09
Posts: 5670

12/04/12 4:17:59 PM#69
Originally posted by grimal
Originally posted by Gaia_Hunter

It is indeed true.

The PvE side of prophecies was slow, but it was clearly designed as an introduction to the PvP, with the Crystal desert missions teaching PvP mechanics.

The last big addition to PvP was Factions, which introduced a very quick PvE campaign and Allianced Battles, Jade Quarry and Fort Aspenwood as a bridge between PvE and PvP.

The objective up until that time was to encourage players to do PvE as a tutorial (PvP purists criticized Anet for forcing them to play PvE to unlock skills and weapons) and then move into PvP.

Also seen in the insistance of keeping the skills the same for PvE and PvP.

Anet then just changed its view and focused on giving PvE players things to do if they wanted to strictly play PvE like titles, PvE-only skills, Hard Mode, etc.

Eye of the North was strictly a PvE campaign (aside from a handfull of profession skills).

In the End it might have been a PvE and a PvP game but it started as a PvP game with a minor PvE component and evolved into a game where PvE was as important if not more important than PvP.

GW2 splits the PvE from the PvP from the get go.

If one compares Nightfall and Eye of the North with Prophecies and Factions, there is little doubt that the game shifted towards PvE.

If we compare GW2 with Prophecies the difference about the ratio of PvE:PvP content is mind numbing.

I still found the PVE content to be quite bountiful.  I think neglecting that portion of the game and reducing the entire campaing to nothing more than "introduction" to PVP is really not giving it it's fair due.

The pve in Prophecies, and to a lesser extent Factions, was really good.  I almost never did pvp in GW until FA, JQ and Alliance battles.  But it's pretty clear that the whole reason pve existed in those games was to teach you pvp and countering.  Each area and mission was designed to pit you against certain types of foes and builds.  You learned how to counter hexes, conditions, etc. and the need for shutdown and support to defeat an opponent.  Very rarely in later parts of the game could you purely tank-n-spank.  You had to counter.

The pve was awesome though.  The story was even a lot more cool than GW2 for me.  GW2 is still my favorite game because it has so much of what I wanted from GW.  I miss a few of my favorite things (such as heroes), but overall it's a great game.  GW didn't have much to it when Prophecies was first released.  Most of what makes it so awesome now is what they added over time.  I see the same thing happening with GW2.

I think a mind wipe so people could play an mmo like it was their first time again, would be easier to build than a new mmo people here would actually like. - DamonVile

  PaRoXiTiC

Hard Core Member

Joined: 3/11/08
Posts: 482

12/04/12 6:24:07 PM#70

I gotta hand it to them. They know how to get players.

Period.

  EsLafiel

Novice Member

Joined: 4/19/12
Posts: 91

12/04/12 11:28:17 PM#71
Originally posted by grimal
Originally posted by EsLafiel
Originally posted by fiontar
Originally posted by snapfusion
Originally posted by Volgore

Sounds good, but i guess alot of players would prefer them to fix their basic game in first place.

The state of many mechanics, systems and classes is still embarrasing, while ANet's communication (or shall i say "attitude") is just unprofessional.

Got my money's worth though, but no amount of content is going to bring me back as long as they don't get their basic game together.

The reason I left GW2 had nothing to do with content, its the incredibly simplistic repetative combat mechanics.  The lack of game immersion with the instancing of every zone,  All the quick travel, it just doesnt feel like a world it just like multiplayer maps all stiched together.

I find the game very immersive. I typically only quick travel when logging on and before logging off, unless I need to meet up with guildmates some where. The zones are massive and I spent about 10 hours, split over two days, completing one of the level 70-80 zones. The zones are beautiful and well designed. I also regularly return to lower level zones I like and once the goal of zone completion is out of the way, I can spend days just doing my own thing there. Sometimes I focus on a region, rather than a zone, doing a patrol circuit, gathering and doing all the DEs I stumble across. The brief zoning is a tiny blip that I don't even register any more.

I've logged over 570 hours since launch. I still have zones I haven't seen. Tons of hidden locations I know exist, refuse to use spoilers to find and haven't seriously starting looking for yet. In an era where most MMOs are lucky to provide 40-80 hours of game play before transitioning to end rgame raid progressions, GW2 is a huge breath of fresh air and by far the best value in the genre.

As to combat, yeah, controlled encounters can feel a bit repetative in that most professions can handle routine encounters with a set routine of a small number of skills and the occassional dodge, (along with a lot of movement. If you aren't moving most of the time in GW2 combat, you probably aren't doing it right). The combat shines when the unpredictable happens, with adds or a tougher mob than you were expecting. Rather than sticking to a set routine, the player is usually forced to open up the full toolkit of skills available to them, really pay attention to the timing of their dodges and move skillfuly.

Even as a level 80 with Exotic Gear who can solo very tough level 80 encounters with some skill, tactics and strategy, I still find myself taking a dirt nap while running around in a lower level zone because I failed to pay attention or underestimated the difficulty of a situation, or just because I didn't notice a roving patrol until it was too late. That's what I love about this game.

If I start to get bored with the combat dynamics of my profession, I'll change up my weapon choices, or my build and learn to master a different way of doing things. A Dagger/Dagger thief plays a good deal different than a Sword/Pistol thief or a Shortbow thief, even with in the same trait build. In other games, I may have 30 skills to juggle, but if I want to significantly change the way combat plays out, I probably need to role a new class, since talent trees usually offer very few play altering options. GW2s professions also play very differently from each other. Profession choice and weapon/build options provide many dozens of mainstream options for people to fit a particular playstyle, with many viable fringe builds on top of the more recognized options.

The world here is massive. World vs. World PvP and Structured PvP are fun and compelling. There is a lot of dungeon content for those who like those things.

IMO, the live content updates so far have been a mixed bag, but I mostly appreciate what they are trying to do, even if they haven't always succeeded. I disagree with some recent additions to the game, but there is so much to do here I can afford to skip things I don't like or just don't care to be a part of. I'm hoping that future content additions will be a little more balanced. (Less "end game" and more World Content). I like the sound of the hype Colin has put forth, but given the many ways the relatively modest November Event failed, or the sparsity of content in the new mini-zone, I have to be a bit skeptical about a pair of updates promising to add "a full expansion's worth of content" to the game. I'll believe it when I see it. :)

+1 for this,

 

Ive got entire zones that ive not gotten to and I got close to 900hrs.

 

900 hours is 37 days of nonstop play.  I would not consider that casual.  I'm just pointing this out because you are obviously a hardcore fan for putting in that amount of time.

There's nothing wrong with that, it's just that extreme views often blind themselves to others.

 

Not a fanboy through, I hated gw1 stop it in less then 2weeks of gameplay.ArenaNet did not like much and still not on my fav list of devs. Their is multy things that they done that piss me off and other things that I believe should have been done before launch even. Also their is systems in the game that is no where near to my liking.

I'm the type that spends 2 weeks on a mmo and then get bored as hell of it, because of it over last 6 years play more mmos then I can remember.

However with all of it faults, I still like gw2 weirdly.

I dont understand why I like it so much, only got it on a off chance that it be fun was not expacting much at all.

Also I see tons of problems and flaws in it, however so far never had have as much fun as ive had in this mmo in any other game. It keeps me comming back, I love the dgns,, beating them 2 men with dub is fun as hell. Fractals are awesome, I love the jps,, I love finding things on map thats not mark. Like this gaint tower in caldron forest, from the top of it ya can see entire map, it not mark and hard to find and then hard to figout how to get to top.

Their nothing their but it epic being ontop of it. It like my own little spot. I want the 29 mini games spread in all the major cities to be put in already, among other things. 

 

In the end it got a long ass way to go, however I feel great playing it and watching it change.

 

 

 

  Celcius

Novice Member

Joined: 7/20/04
Posts: 931

12/05/12 3:44:04 PM#72
Originally posted by Volgore

Sounds good, but i guess alot of players would prefer them to fix their basic game in first place.

The state of many mechanics, systems and classes is still embarrasing, while ANet's communication (or shall i say "attitude") is just unprofessional.

Got my money's worth though, but no amount of content is going to bring me back as long as they don't get their basic game together.

While bug fixes are important, the fact of the matter is that content production has absolutely nothing to do with fixing bugs. There are different teams that do different things at a large company like ArenaNet. Everyone does not sit idle while a team fixes bugs. The bugs are fixed WHILE other content is being developed for the game. If they focused on fixing the bugs "first" then all that would mean is that there are teams of people doing absolutely nothing at the company.

The pace that bugs are fixed won't change based on the rate at which content is produced. Bug fixes are ongoing and are not actually impacted by the pace of new content.

  IPolygon

Advanced Member

Joined: 11/20/11
Posts: 701

12/06/12 6:02:07 AM#73
Originally posted by Celcius
Originally posted by Volgore

Sounds good, but i guess alot of players would prefer them to fix their basic game in first place.

The state of many mechanics, systems and classes is still embarrasing, while ANet's communication (or shall i say "attitude") is just unprofessional.

Got my money's worth though, but no amount of content is going to bring me back as long as they don't get their basic game together.

While bug fixes are important, the fact of the matter is that content production has absolutely nothing to do with fixing bugs. There are different teams that do different things at a large company like ArenaNet. Everyone does not sit idle while a team fixes bugs. The bugs are fixed WHILE other content is being developed for the game. If they focused on fixing the bugs "first" then all that would mean is that there are teams of people doing absolutely nothing at the company.

The pace that bugs are fixed won't change based on the rate at which content is produced. Bug fixes are ongoing and are not actually impacted by the pace of new content.

 

It depends on the bug. If the bug is somewhere in the codebase then sure, the pace of new content is not affected by bugfixing. However if the bug is somewhere within a single DE, then that DE is bugged and needs to be fixed by a content designer. They are the ones who use their inhouse tool Duo (I think it was called like that) for scripting purposes. Fixing DE bugs should at least take away some resources from the content design team.
  Celcius

Novice Member

Joined: 7/20/04
Posts: 931

12/06/12 1:05:18 PM#74
Originally posted by IPolygon
Originally posted by Celcius
Originally posted by Volgore

Sounds good, but i guess alot of players would prefer them to fix their basic game in first place.

The state of many mechanics, systems and classes is still embarrasing, while ANet's communication (or shall i say "attitude") is just unprofessional.

Got my money's worth though, but no amount of content is going to bring me back as long as they don't get their basic game together.

While bug fixes are important, the fact of the matter is that content production has absolutely nothing to do with fixing bugs. There are different teams that do different things at a large company like ArenaNet. Everyone does not sit idle while a team fixes bugs. The bugs are fixed WHILE other content is being developed for the game. If they focused on fixing the bugs "first" then all that would mean is that there are teams of people doing absolutely nothing at the company.

The pace that bugs are fixed won't change based on the rate at which content is produced. Bug fixes are ongoing and are not actually impacted by the pace of new content.

 

It depends on the bug. If the bug is somewhere in the codebase then sure, the pace of new content is not affected by bugfixing. However if the bug is somewhere within a single DE, then that DE is bugged and needs to be fixed by a content designer. They are the ones who use their inhouse tool Duo (I think it was called like that) for scripting purposes. Fixing DE bugs should at least take away some resources from the content design team.

If there is a bug it has to first be confirmed by QA and reproduced. If there is trouble reproducing a bug then it will not reach the one or two guys who actually deal with that area of the code. You and me don't know how their code work, one DE having a bug could actually be a much larger issue and something that is indirectly connected to it. (Not in game, but in the code) These kinds of issues are harder to reproduce as the QA team has to reproduce it by touching on other areas of the system, which can and will take time. So it takes longer to reproduce the bug, thus it takes longer to get fixed.

Content designers dont fix bugs. Content designers...create content. Alot of those guys don't even do the coding. Chances are that they have a system in place already to lay out most new content and most of the coding is already done through some kind of in house tool that helps them to design it. (As in, the coders made this tool so that people not familiar with coding can learn this program to produce content for the game)

  IPolygon

Advanced Member

Joined: 11/20/11
Posts: 701

12/07/12 11:40:53 AM#75
Originally posted by Celcius
Originally posted by IPolygon
Originally posted by Celcius
Originally posted by Volgore

Sounds good, but i guess alot of players would prefer them to fix their basic game in first place.

The state of many mechanics, systems and classes is still embarrasing, while ANet's communication (or shall i say "attitude") is just unprofessional.

Got my money's worth though, but no amount of content is going to bring me back as long as they don't get their basic game together.

While bug fixes are important, the fact of the matter is that content production has absolutely nothing to do with fixing bugs. There are different teams that do different things at a large company like ArenaNet. Everyone does not sit idle while a team fixes bugs. The bugs are fixed WHILE other content is being developed for the game. If they focused on fixing the bugs "first" then all that would mean is that there are teams of people doing absolutely nothing at the company.

The pace that bugs are fixed won't change based on the rate at which content is produced. Bug fixes are ongoing and are not actually impacted by the pace of new content.

 

It depends on the bug. If the bug is somewhere in the codebase then sure, the pace of new content is not affected by bugfixing. However if the bug is somewhere within a single DE, then that DE is bugged and needs to be fixed by a content designer. They are the ones who use their inhouse tool Duo (I think it was called like that) for scripting purposes. Fixing DE bugs should at least take away some resources from the content design team.

If there is a bug it has to first be confirmed by QA and reproduced. If there is trouble reproducing a bug then it will not reach the one or two guys who actually deal with that area of the code. You and me don't know how their code work, one DE having a bug could actually be a much larger issue and something that is indirectly connected to it. (Not in game, but in the code) These kinds of issues are harder to reproduce as the QA team has to reproduce it by touching on other areas of the system, which can and will take time. So it takes longer to reproduce the bug, thus it takes longer to get fixed.

Content designers dont fix bugs. Content designers...create content. Alot of those guys don't even do the coding. Chances are that they have a system in place already to lay out most new content and most of the coding is already done through some kind of in house tool that helps them to design it. (As in, the coders made this tool so that people not familiar with coding can learn this program to produce content for the game)

 

Yeah, that's mostly what I said. Content designers usually script game content. They should know how their content works, so they are the first issued to solve the problem, if it is only related to the script itself.
  Celcius

Novice Member

Joined: 7/20/04
Posts: 931

12/07/12 11:51:26 AM#76
Originally posted by IPolygon
Originally posted by Celcius
Originally posted by IPolygon
Originally posted by Celcius
Originally posted by Volgore

Sounds good, but i guess alot of players would prefer them to fix their basic game in first place.

The state of many mechanics, systems and classes is still embarrasing, while ANet's communication (or shall i say "attitude") is just unprofessional.

Got my money's worth though, but no amount of content is going to bring me back as long as they don't get their basic game together.

While bug fixes are important, the fact of the matter is that content production has absolutely nothing to do with fixing bugs. There are different teams that do different things at a large company like ArenaNet. Everyone does not sit idle while a team fixes bugs. The bugs are fixed WHILE other content is being developed for the game. If they focused on fixing the bugs "first" then all that would mean is that there are teams of people doing absolutely nothing at the company.

The pace that bugs are fixed won't change based on the rate at which content is produced. Bug fixes are ongoing and are not actually impacted by the pace of new content.

 

It depends on the bug. If the bug is somewhere in the codebase then sure, the pace of new content is not affected by bugfixing. However if the bug is somewhere within a single DE, then that DE is bugged and needs to be fixed by a content designer. They are the ones who use their inhouse tool Duo (I think it was called like that) for scripting purposes. Fixing DE bugs should at least take away some resources from the content design team.

If there is a bug it has to first be confirmed by QA and reproduced. If there is trouble reproducing a bug then it will not reach the one or two guys who actually deal with that area of the code. You and me don't know how their code work, one DE having a bug could actually be a much larger issue and something that is indirectly connected to it. (Not in game, but in the code) These kinds of issues are harder to reproduce as the QA team has to reproduce it by touching on other areas of the system, which can and will take time. So it takes longer to reproduce the bug, thus it takes longer to get fixed.

Content designers dont fix bugs. Content designers...create content. Alot of those guys don't even do the coding. Chances are that they have a system in place already to lay out most new content and most of the coding is already done through some kind of in house tool that helps them to design it. (As in, the coders made this tool so that people not familiar with coding can learn this program to produce content for the game)

 

Yeah, that's mostly what I said. Content designers usually script game content. They should know how their content works, so they are the first issued to solve the problem, if it is only related to the script itself.

Content designers are not the guys who actually code the content or script anything. The tools are made so that people WITHOUT prior coding knowledge can design new content. The guys who created the tools are the ones responsible for fixing the bugs with them. That is all they do. These guys are not affected by the pace or prioritization of content development on the rest of the game. Only a couple of guys are going to be responsible for dealing with the code for large parts of the game. Anyone who has done any coding knows that if you throw too many coders at any piece of coding language (ie: more then 2-3) that it is just a disaster waiting to happen.

  botrytis

Elite Member

Joined: 1/04/05
Posts: 2516

12/07/12 12:02:57 PM#77
Originally posted by Celcius
Originally posted by Volgore

Sounds good, but i guess alot of players would prefer them to fix their basic game in first place.

The state of many mechanics, systems and classes is still embarrasing, while ANet's communication (or shall i say "attitude") is just unprofessional.

Got my money's worth though, but no amount of content is going to bring me back as long as they don't get their basic game together.

While bug fixes are important, the fact of the matter is that content production has absolutely nothing to do with fixing bugs. There are different teams that do different things at a large company like ArenaNet. Everyone does not sit idle while a team fixes bugs. The bugs are fixed WHILE other content is being developed for the game. If they focused on fixing the bugs "first" then all that would mean is that there are teams of people doing absolutely nothing at the company.

The pace that bugs are fixed won't change based on the rate at which content is produced. Bug fixes are ongoing and are not actually impacted by the pace of new content.

My wife is a scientific programmer and she always says, 'The last bug will be fixed when the last user is dead.' There will always be some bugs, it is hard to deal with them all.

"In 50 years, when I talk to my grandchildren about these days, I'll make sure to mention what an accomplished MMO player I was. They are going to be so proud ..."
by Naqaj - 7/17/2013 MMORPG.com forum

  Nadia

Elite Member

Joined: 7/26/03
Posts: 11423

12/07/12 12:13:02 PM#78
Originally posted by botrytis

'The last bug will be fixed when the last user is dead.'

nice quote

  Celcius

Novice Member

Joined: 7/20/04
Posts: 931

12/07/12 1:25:46 PM#79
Originally posted by botrytis
Originally posted by Celcius
Originally posted by Volgore

Sounds good, but i guess alot of players would prefer them to fix their basic game in first place.

The state of many mechanics, systems and classes is still embarrasing, while ANet's communication (or shall i say "attitude") is just unprofessional.

Got my money's worth though, but no amount of content is going to bring me back as long as they don't get their basic game together.

While bug fixes are important, the fact of the matter is that content production has absolutely nothing to do with fixing bugs. There are different teams that do different things at a large company like ArenaNet. Everyone does not sit idle while a team fixes bugs. The bugs are fixed WHILE other content is being developed for the game. If they focused on fixing the bugs "first" then all that would mean is that there are teams of people doing absolutely nothing at the company.

The pace that bugs are fixed won't change based on the rate at which content is produced. Bug fixes are ongoing and are not actually impacted by the pace of new content.

My wife is a scientific programmer and she always says, 'The last bug will be fixed when the last user is dead.' There will always be some bugs, it is hard to deal with them all.

Lol, nice. Yeah thats good stuff.

  Destai

Hard Core Member

Joined: 8/31/09
Posts: 487

12/09/12 11:18:02 PM#80
Originally posted by Zeus.CM

We had a huge Halloween update in October, we just had a big one in November, we have a giant Christmas update coming in December, and all of those have gone over really well, and I think in December people are going to be really excited. But January and February are actually are biggest updates to date. They’re even bigger than all the stuff we did in October, November and December. And I think that when people see how much stuff they’re gonna get for no monthly fee in January and February, they’re probably going to be blown away. These two months combined are basically an expansion’s worth of content for free.

From interview among other things with Colin Johanson from Arenanet:

http://gamingbolt.com/guild-wars-2-interview-we-talk-to-areanet-about-how-the-mmorpg-has-been-doing-post-launch

 

Last month's update with a solid new dungeon and zone, we have something even bigger coming in the next few months. Are you interested what that might be? What do you think what awaits us?

I'm itching to see Woodland Cascades, Deldrimor Front, or the Crystal Desert. It could be new zones, it could be more dungeons, more story - either way, it's exciting!

Current MMOs: Wildstar, Guild Wars 2, the Secret World, World of Warcraft

Past Loves: Guild Wars, Lord of the Rings Online, Everquest

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