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World of Warcraft Forum » General Discussion » This video explains what is wrong with WoW today,

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148 posts found
  Thomas2006

Advanced Member

Joined: 11/16/05
Posts: 752

10/07/12 12:22:43 AM#61


Originally posted by Homitu
I definitely agree with a lot of the video, and I actually think there is a way to maintain both the elitism (not used in the traditional negative sense) of top tier raids as well as accessibility.  The answer lies in not making previous raid tiers (let alone previous expansions' raids and dungeons) utterly obsolete the moment a new tier of content is released.  

Imagine how much content current WoW would have if it featured a down-scaling system similar to GW2 or even FFXI.  This isn't meant to be a "praise the holy features of GW2!" moment, so bear with me.  I'm simply inviting you to imagine this one particular feature, perhaps not implemented in exactly the same way, in an aged game like WoW, which now features 4 full expansions of content.  Imagine if every WoW raid and dungeon was still challenging and offered relevant rewards.  There would be no need to remake 1 or 2 classic dungeons with each expansion; they'd all still be available!

But not only that, the top tier of content could once again be made to be ridiculously challenging and become an elite feat.  The rest of the WoW community, that 99%, would still have so much content to enjoy.  The journey would continue to exist for both subsets.  Then when a new tier comes out once again, that supposed 1% would move on (in addition to still being able to raid any other content they please), while the previous raids would continue to be progressed by the rest of the WoW raiding community.  This content will eventually be able to be seen, relevantly, by all WoW players as a function of both added time dedicated to downing those bosses as well as slightly improved stats (after down-scaling).  

Now, I do think several things will need to be monitored to actually make all content relevant, namely dungeon rewards compared to current tier gear as well as just how challenging the older content remains after down-scaling.  I think increased gear power after down-scaling needs to be significant enough to allow players who couldn't beat that content while it was top tier to get in there and, after making an earnest effort, begin to down the bosses, but not so significant that it feels like a level 85 group returning to a level 70 raid and just blasting their way through, or even a T6 geared group returning to T4 content and completely dominating everything without abiding by the raid mechanics.  

But those are all just the logistics of implementation.  The idea stands regardless of tuning.  


You do know that the lead dev has come out and said that he wants to do a scaling system similar to GW2 as far as dungeons go. That way if a 90 wants to group with a 15 they can and they will still get good gear for a 90. They have just finished all the tech needed to make that happen. Its just a matter of finding a good balance as far as the gear / xp goes for the higher player.

Something they have wanted to do and now that the tech is there is just a matter of making it happen / taking the time to do it.

https://www.youtube.com/user/Toom316 Streaming: Archeage NA

  Alders

Elite Member

Joined: 1/28/10
Posts: 1654

I cannot fiddle but I can make a great state of a small city.

10/07/12 12:46:43 AM#62

I wonder how many of that 1% were the players the genre was originally for and about.

I wonder if there's a correlation between those players, the new players to the genre, and the simplification of certain aspects.

I just wonder.

  Johnie-Marz

Novice Member

Joined: 11/19/09
Posts: 860

10/07/12 12:57:42 AM#63
Originally posted by Ginaz
Originally posted by Johnie-Marz
Originally posted by Luxely

LOL, you guys bitch about everything!!! Nothing pleases you, right? Having the games stay  the way they are for life is not profittable and people will get bored with it fast. They do not make money that way. -_-

At least this weeds out the losers from WoW. 

 

For those who bitches about certain games that disappointed them; why don't you make your own?

 

 

LIVE LONG WOW! <3 

Saying WoW sucks is bitching.

Having facts and figures that show, as the raids have become easier the growth in WoW has slowed then declined. That is an assesment.

 

Facts?  The fact is the WoW reached its peak with player numbers during WOTLK, which many of you so called "old school harcore" types dimissed as too easy.  Blizzard ramped up the difficulty when Cata launched and guess what happened?  They lost a lot of players because of it.  They eased up on the difficulty and it slowed the bleeding quite a bit.  MoP is a return to WOTLK type of difficulty. 

I am not arguing the video is right or wrong. (although I do agree with it) I am saying, a well presented argument where you make a thought out case, is different than Bitching.

Not everyone who complains about a game is a Troll (This is an overall assessment how, on this site, if you say anything negitive about a game, you are accused of being a troll)

Not everyone who enjoys a game and sticks up for it is a fanboi (Same as above)

 

  Karteli

Apprentice Member

Joined: 7/09/12
Posts: 2704

10/07/12 1:09:10 AM#64
Originally posted by Ginaz
Originally posted by Johnie-Marz
Originally posted by Luxely

LOL, you guys bitch about everything!!! Nothing pleases you, right? Having the games stay  the way they are for life is not profittable and people will get bored with it fast. They do not make money that way. -_-

At least this weeds out the losers from WoW. 

 

For those who bitches about certain games that disappointed them; why don't you make your own?

 

 

LIVE LONG WOW! <3 

Saying WoW sucks is bitching.

Having facts and figures that show, as the raids have become easier the growth in WoW has slowed then declined. That is an assesment.

 

Facts?  The fact is the WoW reached its peak with player numbers during WOTLK, which many of you so called "old school harcore" types dimissed as too easy.  Blizzard ramped up the difficulty when Cata launched and guess what happened?  They lost a lot of players because of it.  They eased up on the difficulty and it slowed the bleeding quite a bit.  MoP is a return to WOTLK type of difficulty. 

Umm Blizzard merged with Activision in 2009, during WotLK.  Quality went down from there.  Cataclysm was an Activisoin-Blizzard attempt to spark life back into the game.  Folks like me found out the difference that Activision brought .. quality went down, details went down, a few raid bosses were hard? Pffft. hardly an expansion.

 

I saw the difference.  I didn't like it and I unsubscribbed.

Want a nice understanding of life? Try Spirit Science: "The Human History"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8NNHmV3QPw&feature=plcp
Recognize the voice? Yep sounds like Penny Arcade's Extra Credits.

  SuperXero89

Advanced Member

Joined: 8/16/09
Posts: 2607

10/07/12 1:12:51 AM#65

The major problem with this guy's video 2 minutes in is that he starts insinuating that the journey means the same thing to everyone as it does to him.  His examples rely almost entirely on achieving world firsts or being one of the view to complete a difficult raid encounter.  What about those of us who don't give two flips about  raid-based achievement?  What about those of us who just enjoyed leveling characters with buddies then running some casual raids on the side?  I've played WoW since launch, but I really got into it near the end of TBC, and I can say that I certainly enjoyed my journey.

This guy comes off as a crybaby ex-WoW raider who is upset because he can't feel his e-penis getting hard every time he walks into Stormwind with his high item level purples.  Everyone has them now, so he no longer feels special.  Because his entire sense of enjoyment of the game is derived from its ability to make him feel superior, he no longer has any reason to enjoy WoW.

  Goll25

Advanced Member

Joined: 1/19/10
Posts: 187

10/07/12 1:18:33 AM#66

I kept posting that around lately. This is 100% correct though!

  Karteli

Apprentice Member

Joined: 7/09/12
Posts: 2704

10/07/12 1:20:33 AM#67
Originally posted by SuperXero89

The major problem with this guy's video 2 minutes in is that he starts insinuating that the journey means the same thing to everyone as it does to him.  His examples rely almost entirely on achieving world firsts or being one of the view to complete a difficult raid encounter.  What about those of us who don't give two flips about  raid-based achievement?  What about those of us who just enjoyed leveling characters with buddies then running some casual raids on the side?  I've played WoW since launch, but I really got into it near the end of TBC, and I can say that I certainly enjoyed my journey.

This guy comes off as a crybaby ex-WoW raider who is upset because he can't feel his e-penis getting hard every time he walks into Stormwind with his high item level purples.  Everyone has them now, so he no longer feels special.  Because his entire sense of enjoyment of the game is derived from its ability to make him feel superior, he no longer has any reason to enjoy WoW.

If you "really" got into WoW at the end of TBC you would know the value of purples, and not be trivializing them now.

 

I feel it is silly to have everyone now in "epic" purple gear.  Does this make everyone feel normal now?  Is everyone comfortable in the same gear?

 

I'd get my ass kicked if I went into my ADnD group and demanded that we all have the same level & gear, regardless of time spent campaigning.  And yes, contrary to stigma, some roleplayers are bodybuilders.

Want a nice understanding of life? Try Spirit Science: "The Human History"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8NNHmV3QPw&feature=plcp
Recognize the voice? Yep sounds like Penny Arcade's Extra Credits.

  SuperXero89

Advanced Member

Joined: 8/16/09
Posts: 2607

10/07/12 1:28:29 AM#68
Originally posted by Karteli
Originally posted by SuperXero89

The major problem with this guy's video 2 minutes in is that he starts insinuating that the journey means the same thing to everyone as it does to him.  His examples rely almost entirely on achieving world firsts or being one of the view to complete a difficult raid encounter.  What about those of us who don't give two flips about  raid-based achievement?  What about those of us who just enjoyed leveling characters with buddies then running some casual raids on the side?  I've played WoW since launch, but I really got into it near the end of TBC, and I can say that I certainly enjoyed my journey.

This guy comes off as a crybaby ex-WoW raider who is upset because he can't feel his e-penis getting hard every time he walks into Stormwind with his high item level purples.  Everyone has them now, so he no longer feels special.  Because his entire sense of enjoyment of the game is derived from its ability to make him feel superior, he no longer has any reason to enjoy WoW.

If you "really" got into WoW at the end of TBC you would know the value of purples, and not be trivializing them now.

 

I feel it is silly to have everyone now in "epic" purple gear.  Does this make everyone feel normal now?  Is everyone comfortable in the same gear?

 

I'd get my ass kicked if I went into my ADnD group and demanded that we all have the same level, regardless of time spent campaigning.

First of all, everyone doesn't have the same gear regardless of time spent.  It takes time to obtain enough badges for tiered armor, and even then, the badge gear isn't the highest level gear a raider can achieve.  The difference is that these days, gear is more about a number than a physical appearance.  Everyone looks the same because Blizzard is lazy and doesn't really provide players with a wide variety of endgame armor styles.  Beyond that, there's actually a fair amount of gear variety that makes it easy to distinguish players who have been raiding for a week from players who have been raiding for months as long as you have a gear score or item level add-on.  Raid bosses drop tokens to exchange for better gear among other loot that is often better than common badge gear.  This isn't even getting into heroic raid drops.  Heroic raiding is something people always forget about when mentioning WoW anyway.

Regardless of all that, I don't really care about other people.  My sense of enjoyment is not derived from what other people have or do not have.  I know what I enjoy doing in WoW, and I do what I have to in order to get to that point.  I really don't need some sort of gold star to prove to everyone that I'm elite because I've been subscribed longer than the other guy.

  User Deleted
10/07/12 1:34:07 AM#69

Basically crying about how more people than just his elite get to see content?

Yeah, very interesting video.

  Karteli

Apprentice Member

Joined: 7/09/12
Posts: 2704

10/07/12 1:40:05 AM#70
Originally posted by SuperXero89
Originally posted by Karteli
Originally posted by SuperXero89

The major problem with this guy's video 2 minutes in is that he starts insinuating that the journey means the same thing to everyone as it does to him.  His examples rely almost entirely on achieving world firsts or being one of the view to complete a difficult raid encounter.  What about those of us who don't give two flips about  raid-based achievement?  What about those of us who just enjoyed leveling characters with buddies then running some casual raids on the side?  I've played WoW since launch, but I really got into it near the end of TBC, and I can say that I certainly enjoyed my journey.

This guy comes off as a crybaby ex-WoW raider who is upset because he can't feel his e-penis getting hard every time he walks into Stormwind with his high item level purples.  Everyone has them now, so he no longer feels special.  Because his entire sense of enjoyment of the game is derived from its ability to make him feel superior, he no longer has any reason to enjoy WoW.

If you "really" got into WoW at the end of TBC you would know the value of purples, and not be trivializing them now.

 

I feel it is silly to have everyone now in "epic" purple gear.  Does this make everyone feel normal now?  Is everyone comfortable in the same gear?

 

I'd get my ass kicked if I went into my ADnD group and demanded that we all have the same level, regardless of time spent campaigning.

First of all, everyone doesn't have the same gear regardless of time spent.  It takes time to obtain enough badges for tiered armor, and even then, the badge gear isn't the highest level gear a raider can achieve.  The difference is that these days, gear is more about a number than a physical appearance.  Everyone looks the same because Blizzard is lazy and doesn't really provide players with a wide variety of endgame armor styles.  Beyond that, there's actually a fair amount of gear variety that makes it easy to distinguish players who have been raiding for a week from players who have been raiding for months as long as you have a gear score or item level add-on.  Raid bosses drop tokens to exchange for better gear among other loot that is often better than common badge gear.  This isn't even getting into heroic raid drops.  Heroic raiding is something people always forget about when mentioning WoW anyway.

Regardless of all that, I don't really care about other people.  My sense of enjoyment is not derived from what other people have or do not have.  I know what I enjoy doing in WoW, and I do what I have to in order to get to that point.  I really don't need some sort of gold star to prove to everyone that I'm elite because I've been subscribed longer than the other guy.

But do you get a feeling of acomplishment knowing that you bested the game in whatever your time frame is, a week, a couple weeks or even a month?  Is the tier grind sufficient, or would you rather tiers stack (like MC, BWL, NAXX).

 

I prefer tiers to stack, that adds to my feeling of accomplishment.

Want a nice understanding of life? Try Spirit Science: "The Human History"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8NNHmV3QPw&feature=plcp
Recognize the voice? Yep sounds like Penny Arcade's Extra Credits.

  Reizla

Elite Member

Joined: 12/09/08
Posts: 3013

MMORPGs are no longer about the mass multi-user anymore *sadly*

10/07/12 1:42:44 AM#71
Originally posted by Zecktorin
Originally posted by Reizla
This is not a problem with WoW only. It's a problem with all (older) MMORPG's out there. I used to play Lineage II since C2 (2005). It was damn hard then. By now every new player can hit 85 in less than 1 month, and it took me 4 years to reach it back then.
Just face it us (old-school players) are a dieing breed and either have to giev in to the kids who want things easy or quit playing MMORPG's all together *opting latter choice*

Not yet theres still hope with sandbox games coming from indie devs. EvE is doing well( good game but im a littel biased on that lol). Archeage looks promising as a pve sandbox. Lets not forget Darkfall which I will be playing. I'm a big pvp guy and im currently enjoying the hell out of the first darkfall.

As far as themeparks I think TESO jsu tmight surprise people, but news so far isn't looking good.

Naming only 4 titles here proofs my point I think... With over 400 games in the list here on MMORPG.com, 1% of the games that didn't get that easy for the general public is real sad :(

I know EVE is awesome, IF you like a SciFi game (which I don't). I am waiting for ArcheAge as well, I hope that'll give me back that old Lineage Ii feeling of slow progression and actually being proud of accomplishments. DF might be good, but it's 1st person combat, and I just suck at that... TESo as themepark is one thing I'll probably skip for sure. TES is a sandbox siingle-player and they make it a themepark for online? #FAIL!

Demigoth's RPG adventures ~ My blog

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  Ausare

Novice Member

Joined: 3/23/11
Posts: 870

10/07/12 1:46:07 AM#72
You call it easier....many call it more fun. Not enough people to support, financially, non fun games like eve and df.
  SuperXero89

Advanced Member

Joined: 8/16/09
Posts: 2607

10/07/12 1:54:54 AM#73
Originally posted by Karteli
Originally posted by SuperXero89
Originally posted by Karteli
Originally posted by SuperXero89

The major problem with this guy's video 2 minutes in is that he starts insinuating that the journey means the same thing to everyone as it does to him.  His examples rely almost entirely on achieving world firsts or being one of the view to complete a difficult raid encounter.  What about those of us who don't give two flips about  raid-based achievement?  What about those of us who just enjoyed leveling characters with buddies then running some casual raids on the side?  I've played WoW since launch, but I really got into it near the end of TBC, and I can say that I certainly enjoyed my journey.

This guy comes off as a crybaby ex-WoW raider who is upset because he can't feel his e-penis getting hard every time he walks into Stormwind with his high item level purples.  Everyone has them now, so he no longer feels special.  Because his entire sense of enjoyment of the game is derived from its ability to make him feel superior, he no longer has any reason to enjoy WoW.

If you "really" got into WoW at the end of TBC you would know the value of purples, and not be trivializing them now.

 

I feel it is silly to have everyone now in "epic" purple gear.  Does this make everyone feel normal now?  Is everyone comfortable in the same gear?

 

I'd get my ass kicked if I went into my ADnD group and demanded that we all have the same level, regardless of time spent campaigning.

First of all, everyone doesn't have the same gear regardless of time spent.  It takes time to obtain enough badges for tiered armor, and even then, the badge gear isn't the highest level gear a raider can achieve.  The difference is that these days, gear is more about a number than a physical appearance.  Everyone looks the same because Blizzard is lazy and doesn't really provide players with a wide variety of endgame armor styles.  Beyond that, there's actually a fair amount of gear variety that makes it easy to distinguish players who have been raiding for a week from players who have been raiding for months as long as you have a gear score or item level add-on.  Raid bosses drop tokens to exchange for better gear among other loot that is often better than common badge gear.  This isn't even getting into heroic raid drops.  Heroic raiding is something people always forget about when mentioning WoW anyway.

Regardless of all that, I don't really care about other people.  My sense of enjoyment is not derived from what other people have or do not have.  I know what I enjoy doing in WoW, and I do what I have to in order to get to that point.  I really don't need some sort of gold star to prove to everyone that I'm elite because I've been subscribed longer than the other guy.

But do you get a feeling of acomplishment knowing that you bested the game in whatever your time frame is, a week, a couple weeks or even a month?  Is the tier grind sufficient, or would you rather tiers stack (like MC, BWL, NAXX).

 

I prefer tiers to stack, that adds to my feeling of accomplishment.

I don't care about your sense of accomplishment though. That's the problem.  You really shouldn't be using a video game to derive a sense of accomplishment.   I don't understand why so many people can't seem to enjoy a video game for any other reason aside from its ability to make them feel good about themselves.  It's sad really.

Yes, I do feel accomplished when I complete a raid on the first try, but then again, I put things in perspective.  I realize it's not that big of a deal.  It's a video game.  No one in the real world cares that you finished Nax 25-man after 3 months of failed attempts.  Likewise, I do not enjoy beating my head against a brick wall for months trying to complete some content.  If that happens, I'm likely to find more productive ways to spend my time.  It's honestly a balancing act.  You want content that is not mind numbingly easy, but at the same time, you don't want to make content so difficult that it frustrates the majority of the game's playerbase.  Overall, I think WoW strikes a fine balance.

Lastly, stacking tiers as you call it was done away with to help new players break into the raid scene.  In the original EverQuest, it was very difficult, if not impossible for a player who started in around 2003 to break into the raid scene which largely consisted of content that had been stacking on top of itself since Ruins of Kunark.  At least WoW reset the gear cycle every expansion, so it wasn't as bad, but it was still a major pain for new players who hit the level cap in the middle of the expansion cycle.  I'm sure you felt good being able to strut around Stormwind in your exclusive gear, but sometimes, you have to give a little up for the benefit of the game.  There are still ways in which you can set yourself apart even if everyone has purple gear now.

  Karteli

Apprentice Member

Joined: 7/09/12
Posts: 2704

10/07/12 2:23:43 AM#74
Originally posted by SuperXero89
Originally posted by Karteli
Originally posted by SuperXero89
Originally posted by Karteli
Originally posted by SuperXero89

The major problem with this guy's video 2 minutes in is that he starts insinuating that the journey means the same thing to everyone as it does to him.  His examples rely almost entirely on achieving world firsts or being one of the view to complete a difficult raid encounter.  What about those of us who don't give two flips about  raid-based achievement?  What about those of us who just enjoyed leveling characters with buddies then running some casual raids on the side?  I've played WoW since launch, but I really got into it near the end of TBC, and I can say that I certainly enjoyed my journey.

This guy comes off as a crybaby ex-WoW raider who is upset because he can't feel his e-penis getting hard every time he walks into Stormwind with his high item level purples.  Everyone has them now, so he no longer feels special.  Because his entire sense of enjoyment of the game is derived from its ability to make him feel superior, he no longer has any reason to enjoy WoW.

If you "really" got into WoW at the end of TBC you would know the value of purples, and not be trivializing them now.

 

I feel it is silly to have everyone now in "epic" purple gear.  Does this make everyone feel normal now?  Is everyone comfortable in the same gear?

 

I'd get my ass kicked if I went into my ADnD group and demanded that we all have the same level, regardless of time spent campaigning.

First of all, everyone doesn't have the same gear regardless of time spent.  It takes time to obtain enough badges for tiered armor, and even then, the badge gear isn't the highest level gear a raider can achieve.  The difference is that these days, gear is more about a number than a physical appearance.  Everyone looks the same because Blizzard is lazy and doesn't really provide players with a wide variety of endgame armor styles.  Beyond that, there's actually a fair amount of gear variety that makes it easy to distinguish players who have been raiding for a week from players who have been raiding for months as long as you have a gear score or item level add-on.  Raid bosses drop tokens to exchange for better gear among other loot that is often better than common badge gear.  This isn't even getting into heroic raid drops.  Heroic raiding is something people always forget about when mentioning WoW anyway.

Regardless of all that, I don't really care about other people.  My sense of enjoyment is not derived from what other people have or do not have.  I know what I enjoy doing in WoW, and I do what I have to in order to get to that point.  I really don't need some sort of gold star to prove to everyone that I'm elite because I've been subscribed longer than the other guy.

But do you get a feeling of acomplishment knowing that you bested the game in whatever your time frame is, a week, a couple weeks or even a month?  Is the tier grind sufficient, or would you rather tiers stack (like MC, BWL, NAXX).

 

I prefer tiers to stack, that adds to my feeling of accomplishment.

I don't care about your sense of accomplishment though. That's the problem.  You really shouldn't be using a video game to derive a sense of accomplishment.   I don't understand why so many people can't seem to enjoy a video game for any other reason aside from its ability to make them feel good about themselves.  It's sad really.

Yes, I do feel accomplished when I complete a raid on the first try, but then again, I put things in perspective.  I realize it's not that big of a deal.  It's a video game.  No one in the real world cares that you finished Nax 25-man after 3 months of failed attempts.  Likewise, I do not enjoy beating my head against a brick wall for months trying to complete some content.  If that happens, I'm likely to find more productive ways to spend my time.  It's honestly a balancing act.  You want content that is not mind numbingly easy, but at the same time, you don't want to make content so difficult that it frustrates the majority of the game's playerbase.  Overall, I think WoW strikes a fine balance.

Lastly, stacking tiers as you call it was done away with to help new players break into the raid scene.  In the original EverQuest, it was very difficult, if not impossible for a player who started in around 2003 to break into the raid scene which largely consisted of content that had been stacking on top of itself since Ruins of Kunark.  At least WoW reset the gear cycle every expansion, so it wasn't as bad, but it was still a major pain for new players who hit the level cap in the middle of the expansion cycle.  I'm sure you felt good being able to strut around Stormwind in your exclusive gear, but sometimes, you have to give a little up for the benefit of the game.  There are still ways in which you can set yourself apart even if everyone has purple gear now.

Like I mentioned earlier, I was an average raider who topped off midway in BWL in my guild, without completing it during Vanilla.  I wouldn't call that exclusive raiding, but you might.

 

I never said I like excessively difficult content, as inferred by your post.  I also never struted around Stormwind in my exclusive gear, unless you consider full MC as exclusive, a year into the game.  I liked the fact that my guild "could" complete content and get more, if we were capable of it (which we weren't), although obtaining the new content was in no way necessary or required.  It would just be for fun.  It was there if we wanted it.

 

I get the feeling you are venting, not at anything I said, but just to everyone in general.  Hence all the misdirections and incorrect accusations.

Want a nice understanding of life? Try Spirit Science: "The Human History"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8NNHmV3QPw&feature=plcp
Recognize the voice? Yep sounds like Penny Arcade's Extra Credits.

  Axxar

Hard Core Member

Joined: 12/09/08
Posts: 1959

"See how I reward those who fail me!"

10/07/12 2:25:50 AM#75
I think the guy is extremely wrong when he says it's OK that less than 1% goes in a certain dungeon. But I do agree with lots of other points he makes.

Currently playing: Divinity: Original Sin, FTL, Hearthstone and Skyrim.
Eagerly anticipating: Camelot Unchained, Elite: Dangerous, Legend of Grimrock 2 and Star Citizen.

  Hurvart

Novice Member

Joined: 11/02/10
Posts: 566

10/07/12 2:30:57 AM#76
Originally posted by SuperXero89
Originally posted by Karteli
Originally posted by SuperXero89
Originally posted by Karteli
Originally posted by SuperXero89

The major problem with this guy's video 2 minutes in is that he starts insinuating that the journey means the same thing to everyone as it does to him.  His examples rely almost entirely on achieving world firsts or being one of the view to complete a difficult raid encounter.  What about those of us who don't give two flips about  raid-based achievement?  What about those of us who just enjoyed leveling characters with buddies then running some casual raids on the side?  I've played WoW since launch, but I really got into it near the end of TBC, and I can say that I certainly enjoyed my journey.

This guy comes off as a crybaby ex-WoW raider who is upset because he can't feel his e-penis getting hard every time he walks into Stormwind with his high item level purples.  Everyone has them now, so he no longer feels special.  Because his entire sense of enjoyment of the game is derived from its ability to make him feel superior, he no longer has any reason to enjoy WoW.

If you "really" got into WoW at the end of TBC you would know the value of purples, and not be trivializing them now.

 

I feel it is silly to have everyone now in "epic" purple gear.  Does this make everyone feel normal now?  Is everyone comfortable in the same gear?

 

I'd get my ass kicked if I went into my ADnD group and demanded that we all have the same level, regardless of time spent campaigning.

First of all, everyone doesn't have the same gear regardless of time spent.  It takes time to obtain enough badges for tiered armor, and even then, the badge gear isn't the highest level gear a raider can achieve.  The difference is that these days, gear is more about a number than a physical appearance.  Everyone looks the same because Blizzard is lazy and doesn't really provide players with a wide variety of endgame armor styles.  Beyond that, there's actually a fair amount of gear variety that makes it easy to distinguish players who have been raiding for a week from players who have been raiding for months as long as you have a gear score or item level add-on.  Raid bosses drop tokens to exchange for better gear among other loot that is often better than common badge gear.  This isn't even getting into heroic raid drops.  Heroic raiding is something people always forget about when mentioning WoW anyway.

Regardless of all that, I don't really care about other people.  My sense of enjoyment is not derived from what other people have or do not have.  I know what I enjoy doing in WoW, and I do what I have to in order to get to that point.  I really don't need some sort of gold star to prove to everyone that I'm elite because I've been subscribed longer than the other guy.

But do you get a feeling of acomplishment knowing that you bested the game in whatever your time frame is, a week, a couple weeks or even a month?  Is the tier grind sufficient, or would you rather tiers stack (like MC, BWL, NAXX).

 

I prefer tiers to stack, that adds to my feeling of accomplishment.

I don't care about your sense of accomplishment though. That's the problem.  You really shouldn't be using a video game to derive a sense of accomplishment.   I don't understand why so many people can't seem to enjoy a video game for any other reason aside from its ability to make them feel good about themselves.  It's sad really.

Yes, I do feel accomplished when I complete a raid on the first try, but then again, I put things in perspective.  I realize it's not that big of a deal.  It's a video game.  No one in the real world cares that you finished Nax 25-man after 3 months of failed attempts.  Likewise, I do not enjoy beating my head against a brick wall for months trying to complete some content.  If that happens, I'm likely to find more productive ways to spend my time.  It's honestly a balancing act.  You want content that is not mind numbingly easy, but at the same time, you don't want to make content so difficult that it frustrates the majority of the game's playerbase.  Overall, I think WoW strikes a fine balance.

Lastly, stacking tiers as you call it was done away with to help new players break into the raid scene.  In the original EverQuest, it was very difficult, if not impossible for a player who started in around 2003 to break into the raid scene which largely consisted of content that had been stacking on top of itself since Ruins of Kunark.  At least WoW reset the gear cycle every expansion, so it wasn't as bad, but it was still a major pain for new players who hit the level cap in the middle of the expansion cycle.  I'm sure you felt good being able to strut around Stormwind in your exclusive gear, but sometimes, you have to give a little up for the benefit of the game.  There are still ways in which you can set yourself apart even if everyone has purple gear now.

Reseting the gear cycle ruins content.  There is no reason to do old raid content if the gear you get is useless. And if you can get sometning better from a simple solo quest. In EQ that worked much better. A new player in a new raiding guild had to start with raid content from the first expansion. And after farming that he and his guild could eventually start with the latest content. IMO, that means more content for the new player. All content is new the first time you do it. Even if it is old and not part of the latest expansion. How can less content that is rewarding to do make a game better?

In EQ a guild that had to do kunark dragons when the top guilds could do planes of power raids was not very elit. But it was fair. They had to progress and get better gear and later they could do the latest content. There was still a reason to do the kunark dragons. The loot from them was still good for most players. The content was still meaningful to do.

From that point of view reseting the gear cycle will create a dead virtual world. The new player will have less content.

  bubaluba

Novice Member

Joined: 7/23/12
Posts: 464

10/07/12 2:44:57 AM#77
Are you serious with that video??? Can't you remeber to post something better or what? In this video some dude is talking crap and he didn't show anything from Pandaria and probably never tried mop. It is like to talk crap about Mercedes and never tried to drive one. Sorry but it is demode to post again and again some crap about wow. Sub is again over 10 mill and servers are full of players, everyone i know are for now happy with mop.
  Karteli

Apprentice Member

Joined: 7/09/12
Posts: 2704

10/07/12 2:55:18 AM#78
Originally posted by bubaluba
Are you serious with that video??? Can't you remeber to post something better or what? In this video some dude is talking crap and he didn't show anything from Pandaria and probably never tried mop. It is like to talk crap about Mercedes and never tried to drive one. Sorry but it is demode to post again and again some crap about wow. Sub is again over 10 mill and servers are full of players, everyone i know are for now happy with mop.

7 million Chinese and 3 million from US+EU? Mmkay.  But thanks for the marketing tactics.

 

2.7 million MoP sales of 10 mil .. oh yeah, Asians get expansions for free as part of an agreement between Activision-Blizzard and China.  I guess thats why sales are low compared to "subs" >)

Want a nice understanding of life? Try Spirit Science: "The Human History"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8NNHmV3QPw&feature=plcp
Recognize the voice? Yep sounds like Penny Arcade's Extra Credits.

  bubaluba

Novice Member

Joined: 7/23/12
Posts: 464

10/07/12 3:05:55 AM#79
Originally posted by Karteli
Originally posted by bubaluba
Are you serious with that video??? Can't you remeber to post something better or what? In this video some dude is talking crap and he didn't show anything from Pandaria and probably never tried mop. It is like to talk crap about Mercedes and never tried to drive one. Sorry but it is demode to post again and again some crap about wow. Sub is again over 10 mill and servers are full of players, everyone i know are for now happy with mop.

7 million Chinese and 3 million from US+EU? Mmkay.  But thanks for the marketing tactics.

 

2.7 million MoP sales of 10 mil .. oh yeah, Asians get expansions for free as part of an agreement between Activision-Blizzard and China.  I guess thats why sales are low compared to "subs" >)

Oh very nice  and games like eq2, aoc, gw2 you can't buy from China :) Only Blizzard is so ''Samaritan'' with rest of the world. And by the way DO you have some problems with Asian people or what? Well i am from Europe and we don't think about Chinese people as second class of humans and in fact Chinese probably made hardware in your PC

  cheyane

Advanced Member

Joined: 7/17/09
Posts: 2291

10/07/12 3:09:22 AM#80
In the heyday of Wrath of the Lich King were the Chinese not included in the subscriber base count ?

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