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MMORPG Quest

One man's quest through the world of MMORPGs...

Author: elvenprince9

Multiple MMORPG Publishers publishing the same game?

Posted by elvenprince9 Thursday July 30 2009 at 12:26AM
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Why is it that more than one MMORPG game publisher publishes the same game? It doesn’t make any sense. Games like Nostale for example are available in the United States through two different publishers. Players can sign up for the game on nostale.net or on nostale.uforia.com. Isn’t it weird that the same game is available on two different websites? On two completely different servers? I’m not sure what Nostale’s developers were thinking by licensing their game to two different companies in the same region, because as it stands the game’s playerbase is now divided. This really hurts the ‘user experience’ as a game’s community is a big part of MMO games, and having a game’s community split totally sucks for players. To be fair though, NosTale isn’t the only game that’s published by more than one company. La Tale for example is currently being published by the folks over at OGPlanet for North American users, but it looks like Aeriagames will also begin publishing the same exact game soon, as La Tale is currently in Closed beta over at Aeria. Another game, Luminary: Rise of the Goonzu used to be published by both Ndoors and IJJI, but luckily the folks over at IJJI merged their servers with the Ndoors game.

The question now is, why on earth do game developers license their games to multiple publishers? Heck, if I was OG Planet, I would be furious at La Tale’s developers for giving their game to Aeria, especially after initially giving it to OG Planet! Successful games like Atlantica Online, Runes of Magic and Fiesta Online for example don’t license their games to multiple publishers for a reason, so why do some people do it? I’m pretty sure this practice has a lot to do with greed. Developers are looking to milk their games as much as possible, but I feel that this practice will only end up hurting everyone, as a divided community will hurt the user experience causing some people to quit, less players will hurt the publisher and the less revenue publishers make the less the developers make. So, what’s the point of this article? To urge developers to stop licensing their games to multiple publishers!
 

Too Many Free MMORPGs

Posted by elvenprince9 Sunday July 19 2009 at 1:26AM
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Honestly, I think the free to play MMORPG game market is growing way too fast. It seems like every month a n ambitious new game publisher opens its doors for the first time in hopes of making it big in a market overflowing with MMORPGs. Companies like Aeria Games that have multiple successful titles like Last Chaos, Twelve Sky and Shaiya are making money hand over fist in the lucrative micro-transaction based business, but other smaller companies like Uforia who only publish smaller less known games like Red War, Three Kingdoms and Nostale are in risk of going bankrupt. The fact is, there are far more online games out there than the amount of players needed to make them all profitable. What this means is that some of these free MMORPG publishers are doomed to failure.

 

Now, I bet a lot of readers are thinking, “where are the facts? The numbers?”, Well I don’t have any numbers in front of me, but I can say from firsthand experience that a LOT of MMORPG games are deserted. Stone Age 2 for example, only has a handful of players online at any given time. A HANDFUL of players. There’s no way the game’s publisher can recoup their expenses for the game with only a dozen or so players online at any given time. I’ve personally played dozens of games where the total number of players online were less than 100. Personally, I’d love to see every game bustling with activity, but with so many Free MMO games on the market, this isn’t possible. Surprisingly, there are very few major browser games with this problem, as almost every browsed based MMORPG I played had a healthy playerbase.

Why are so many MMORPGs using Bit Torrent now?

Posted by elvenprince9 Saturday July 18 2009 at 6:03AM
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For as long as I can remember, Bit Torrent has been a tool used by pirates to illicitly ‘acquire’ music and movies. Just recently though, over the last year or so, Bit Torrent has grown to become one of the primary download methods for several big MMORPGs. World of Warcraft for example, uses bit torrent for patching while games like Project Powder, Fiesta Online, and GodsWar utilize bit torrent to transfer the entire game client over to players. Personally, I feel that even though bit torrent can speed up downloads on some occasions, it’s almost always slower than a mediocre HTTP direct download. For extremely popular games like Atlantica Online, a bit torrent based downloader could work, as the game has millions of players, but for smaller titles like Wolfteam and Angels Online I’d much rather prefer a reliable direct download than bit torrent.

As I mentioned earlier, bit torrent can be helpful in some cases, but in most cases it’s a lot slower. I can bet that the reason for implementing a bit torrent type solution has a lot more to do with saving bandwidth for the publisher than improving the user experience. I Have nothing against trying to cut costs, but I think publishers should use HTTP direct downloads for their games over bit torrent, as it’s almost always faster. This is sort of a pointless rant, as almost every game publisher offers both options. I guess my what I’m trying to get at is that publishers should make the ‘default’ download option the more familiar direct download method while having the bit torrent option there but secondary. As it stands, a lot of MMORPG games have torrents as the primary download method. At least browser games don’t have this issue!